You’d think standing on one leg is pretty easy but, in reality it’s not. When I get my clients to stand on one leg the first time, very few can do it for more than 10 seconds without falling. It takes a lot of strength in your leg and core, as well as focus, to stand on one leg.

But, like most things that are really hard, standing on one leg is really good for you! You’ll tone and strengthen your foot, leg and buttocks and you’ll improve your concentration. You really can’t let your mind wonder while trying to balance on one foot. Balancing postures also quickly tell you where your imbalances are – if one leg is weaker or tighter than the other, or one hip stabiliser is not working properly, it’ll be pretty obvious.

Here is an advanced balancing posture, Warrior III – which I love but, I admit, it took me A LOT of practice to learn to love it. This posture is great for your feet, ankles and legs and your abs, shoulders and arms get a work out too.

image via Pinterest

image via Pinterest

The trick is to really focus on your standing leg and foot, your foundation. Keep your foot firmly grounded and stand up tall and strong, firm the outer hip of the standing leg in. It’s also important to keep your back leg strong and stretched out while reaching your arms forward, this helps you balance. For full instructions how to do this posture, go to yogajournal.com

 

If your balance is not good, start with a standing knee hug:

image via iSport

image via iSport

Stand tall, planting all four corners of your foot on the floor, make sure your toes are pointing forward. Keep the top of your standing leg strong, straighten your torso and keep your gaze forward. See yoga.isport.com for detailed instructions. ¬†Once you can stand like this for at least 30 seconds, ideally longer, start slowly moving your torso forward and down and your bent leg back and up. Before you know it, you’ll be in a warrior III.